Quassia Root slice Picrasma

 

Constituents : Volatile oil, quassin, gummy extractive pectin, woody fibre, tartrate and sulphate of lime, chlorides of calcium, and sodium, various salts such as oxalate and ammoniacal salt, nitrate of potassa and sulphate of soda.

Quassia, found in the shops in the form of chips or raspings, has little fragrance but does have an intense bitter taste, which will always distinguish the pure drug from adulterations. Quassia wood is a pure bitter tonic and stomachic; it is also a vermicide and slight narcotic; it acts on flies and some of the higher animals as a narcotic poison. It is a valuable remedy in convalescence, after acute disease and in debility and atonic dyspepsia; an antispasmodic in fever. Having no tannic acid, it is frequently given with chalybeates and therefore can be prescribed with salts of iron; as an aromatic bitter stomachic it acts in the same way as calumba. In small doses Quassia increases the appetite. In large doses it acts as an irritant and will cause vomiting; It’s action probably lessens putrefaction in the stomach, and prevents the formation of acid substances during digestion.  Cups made of the wood and filled with liquid will in a few hours become thoroughly impregnated and this drink makes a powerful tonic. The infusion for killing flies should be sweetened with sugar. Is also used as an enema for the expulsion of thread worms.