Harmal Seeds Peganum Harmala seeds SYRIAN RUE

Medicinal uses Peganum harmala is used as an analgesic and antiinflammatory agent.

In Yemen it was used to treat depression,and it has been established in the laboratory that harmaline, an active ingredient in Peganum harmala, is a central nervous system stimulant and a "reversible inhibitor of MAO-A (RIMA)," a category of antidepressant.

 
Peganum harmalaSmoke from the seeds kills algae, bacteria, intestinal parasites and molds. Peganum harmala has "antibacterial activity," including antibacterial activity against drug-resistant bacteria.

The "root is applied to kill lice" and when burned, the seeds kill insects.It also inhibits the reproduction of the Tribolium castaneum beetle.

It is also used as an anthelmintic (to expel parasitic worms). Reportedly the ancient Greeks used powdered Peganum harmala seeds to get rid of tapeworms and to treat recurring fevers (possibly malaria).

Peganum harmala is an abortifacient, and, in large quantities, it can reduce spermatogenesis and male fertility in rats.

Syrian rue prefers dry sandy soil with an alkaline PH.  A mixture of half sand and half soil is ideal.  Adding lime can also help make the PH more alkaline.  A cactus potting soil will also work well.  Sow the seeds just under the surface of the soil and mist lightly.  Syrian rue seedlings are prone to damping off, so make sure to limit your watering.  Some growers will choose to cover the soil with clear plastic until germination begins.  Others will leave it exposed to the open air.  Syrian rue prefers warm temperatures for germination, so bottom heat is beneficial.  Fluorescent light works well for starting seeds. Although a warm sunny window can also suffice.   Outdoors, keep your plants out of direct sun for the first year.  Seeds sown outdoors are best off being started in mid-summer.  Sow just below the surface of a loose, sandy soil.  The plants are sensitive to transplanting, but it can be managed if you do not disturb the roots.